‘The Stratford Upon Avon & Midland Junction Railway’ (or S.M.J.) was a small independent railway company which ran a line across the empty, untouched centre of England. It visited the counties of Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Oxfordshire and a little of Buckinghamshire, only existing as the SMJ from 1909 to 1923. In 1923 the S.M.J.became a minor arm of the London Midland and Scottish (L.M.S.), then in 1948 'British Railways' 

Gone but not forgotten: "the damsel is not dead, but sleepeth"


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SMJ Forum

Site problems? 1 Reply

my screen is all squashed up. Only happened recently, and jot on any other sites I use.Using Safari on iOS.Continue

Started by Simon Dunkley. Last reply by Simon Dunkley Feb 28.

Line Speed 5 Replies

Probably a question or an answer that is on here somewhere and I have missed it, but what was the line running speed? Always get the impression that the trains dawdled along rather than made any great progress.Continue

Started by Gary. Last reply by Peter S Lewis Feb 23.

Interesting Ebay item 1 Reply

Thanks to Gary for the heads up!https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F254054775180AndyContinue

Tags: offering, EBay

Started by Andy Thompson. Last reply by Phil Street Jan 8.

Fenny Compton Goods shed 1 Reply

HelloSome time ago I posted a question concerning the goods shed at Fenny Compton as indicated in the book Track Layout diagrams of the Great Western Railway and B.R. (W.R.) section 29 Stratford-Upon-Avon & Midland Jcn. Rly. by R.A. Cooke ;…Continue

Started by Jack Freuville. Last reply by Simon Dunkley Jan 8.

SMJ photos

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Gentlemen

While bridges appear to be a popular dicussion point how about the two attached images? They came to my collection with a heap of paperwork a few years ago. There is absolutely nothing on the back of them or in the paperwork to aid identification other than the date imprinted on the original negatives as shown on the prints. It appears that the bridge is a rather substantial structure for an occupation bridge but even at that date I would have thought if it was a public road the surface would have been a little better! In any event it clearly needed attention and some strengthening as the photos shown are "before" & "after" shots. The question is "which bridge"? The source of the paperwork and a map examination of the GWR line through Fenny Compton pretty well rule out that it is on the GW line so it is a SMJ line bridge that the LMS were obliged to repair. The date is consistent with the general civil engineering upgrade of the line at that time that the LMS did to allow heavier trains, (including the installation of the round iron strengthening plates on the Avon bridge at Stratford). The suspects in my opinion are SMJ/LMS bridges 55,57,60,or 63. The double arch should be a big clue but I have failed to spot it yet on any maps or other photos. I hope someone will point out where I have missed an obvious answer otherwise some headscratching is required. It is rather irraitating that the photos were taken from different angles but perhaps the photographer did not like the muddy conditions!! I think it safe to assume that these photos were official civil engineers dept ones as I cannot see any other reason for such a subject.

 

John

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Well John I'm pretty sure your photograph depicts the occupation bridge that's the off the Claydon road.About a mile from Fenny Compton its the final bridge before the S.M.J .continues back over the G.W.R..The track beneath the bridge is from the Claydon road leading to the Grand Union Canal.The house in the distance is still there on the roadside.

Alwyn

Isn't this the one we went under and then up on to the track bed from?
If so then a recent picture will be on the line album.

Many thanks to all who replied (including the direct phone calls). Firstly apologies for not searching our site thoroughly because as Gary remarks it has been visited on "walks"

I can now confirm that it is bridge No 60 (21miles & 01chains) a rather substantial "cattle creep" or occupation bridge. The only question now is why is such a bridge an expensive twin arch structure?? I think the clue is in both of the 1927 photos and in modern ones in that the centre line of the bridge is clearly fenced making two separate tracks. I have not checked any land records but my money is on the probability that the land at this point is a boundary between two landowners both of whom were entitled to a bridge under the original Act of Parliament authorising the East & West Junc Railway. It would have been slightly cheaper to construct the one twin arch bridge rather than two separate single arched ones fairly close together.

 

John

Interesting.....the old map dated c.1900 shows a BRIDLE ROAD running all the way from a field past Boddington Reservoir, across the Oxford canal by bridge, across the G.W.R. line by level crossing, and under the E & W Junction railway by a double arch cattle creep. The Bridle Road stops on the Claydon to Fenny Compton road, but a pathway continues into the field opposite. This pathway also runs parallel with the B.R. up to the canal, after which it appears to be a track way.

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