‘The Stratford Upon Avon & Midland Junction Railway’ (or S.M.J.) was a small independent railway company which ran a line across the empty, untouched centre of England. It visited the counties of Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Oxfordshire and a little of Buckinghamshire, only existing as the SMJ from 1909 to 1923. In 1923 the S.M.J.became a minor arm of the London Midland and Scottish (L.M.S.), then in 1948 'British Railways' 

Gone but not forgotten: "the damsel is not dead, but sleepeth"


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SMJ Forum

Planning Application for Binton Station Site 8 Replies

I've just been told by friends from Welford that there's a planning application to redevelop the Binton Station site:Binton Station Planning…Continue

Started by Simon Stevens. Last reply by Simon Stevens 11 hours ago.

Proposed conversion of numbers 5 and 6.

According to Dunn, the problems with the two BP tanks ns 5 and 6 running backwards were twice addressed with the idea of converting them to 2-4-2Ts, and that drawings were prepared on at least one occasion.Has anyone ever seen anything of these…Continue

Started by Simon Dunkley Jun 27.

Broom Junction station site for sale 1 Reply

Great opportunity for an SMJ enthusiast perhaps.  I'm not sure what you could actually do with this site though!…Continue

Started by Simon Stevens. Last reply by Simon Stevens May 17.

Ravenstone Wood as three way junction? 1 Reply

A close analysis of the 1945 RAF aerial photographs available in the historical imagery resource on Google Earth has provided evidence that Ravenstone Wood was probably a three-way junction during the latter part of WW2 and for an unknown period of…Continue

Started by Dave Hayward. Last reply by Robin Cullup Apr 15.

Turntable at Burton Dassett 4 Replies

As part of my research prior to creating a model of the EHLR/SMJ junction at Burton Dassett, I’ve just had the privilege of looking through the original notes and letters produced by Eric Tonks whilst writing his 1948 book “The Edge Hill Light…Continue

Started by Mark Reader. Last reply by Mark Reader Mar 29.

The SMJR Great War Roll of Honour 11 Replies

Many of you will be aware that in common with all other railway companies the SMJR lost many of its employees for all or part of the Great War as the patriotic duty to volunteer was overwhelming.  Railwaymen were technically exempt but many chose to…Continue

Tags: of, Honour, Roll, War, SMJR

Started by John Jennings. Last reply by Simon Stevens Dec 15, 2017.

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Stay with the 30/40 seconds of black to start with. Great shots of Byfield and the inside of the box

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Comment by Dick Bodily on January 7, 2011 at 13:50

Gary

Not as bad an error as that perpetuated on the SMJ - Shakespeare Route DVD where the River Tove is constantly mispronounced to rhyme with the bird dove rather than the town of Hove. Another frequent mispronounciation is to pronounce the 'l' in Olney rather than say 'O-nee'. And in the 60s ITV insisted on pronouncing Towcester as Thow-ses-ter when they used to broadcast the horse races. Still being a Northants lad yourself you'll appreciate that outsiders must have difficulty with some of the crazy official pronounciations we have for places:Bozeat (Bojut) and Cogenhoe (Cookno) spring to mind, let alone some of alternative names and complete mispronounciations locals use for places eg. Artleknock, Shanger, Silson, Biffuld, Farrickson, Culluth, Woodun etc.the list is endless.

Dick

Comment by Stuart Ison on January 6, 2011 at 17:12

You are correct Gary it is pronounced Kineton to rhyme with Chineton.

I live just down the road from there. 

Comment by Gary on January 4, 2011 at 11:30

Nice video - wonder what we are missing in the 40 secs of blackness?

 

SM and J was interesting take on the name.

I never knew Kineton was pronounced "Kinnerton" we've always pronounced it "Kine-ton" as in Chine

Comment by Dick Bodily on January 4, 2011 at 10:16

Peter

Many GC stations including Charwelton had loops. At Woodford there were several options for looping goods trains at both yards, but some of the smaller stations only had a single siding rather like certain SMJ stations. This location could well be Staverton Road where there was a special set back siding (on the up side only) where freights were set back if they were likely to get in the way of faster trains on the climb through Catesby Tunnel. If this was not likely to happen they would proceed to Charwelton and perhaps be put in the loop there if necessary.

Re. the Brit that looks like the parcels to me, although Brits were very occasionally still used on semi-fasts right up to the end.

Dick

Comment by Peter Fleming on January 3, 2011 at 21:00

Great stuff.

 

Mixture of vintages but all interesting.

 

Presumably that was a Britannia at the end in poor condition. Was it on a parcels or the last knockings of the Marylebone to Nottingham service? I wonder where the freight loop was that the O4 set back into. I wonder why it had to set back rather than go straight in - after all the GCR was the most modern line.

Comment by Dick Bodily on January 3, 2011 at 14:24
The 37 seen at the end was most probably on a York - Bournemouth cross country express about to take the Banbury line  at Culworth Junction.

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