‘The Stratford Upon Avon & Midland Junction Railway’ (or S.M.J.) was a small independent railway company which ran a line across the empty, untouched centre of England. It visited the counties of Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Oxfordshire and a little of Buckinghamshire, only existing as the SMJ from 1909 to 1923. In 1923 the S.M.J.became a minor arm of the London Midland and Scottish (L.M.S.), then in 1948 'British Railways' 

Gone but not forgotten: "the damsel is not dead, but sleepeth"


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SMJ Forum

Broom Junction station site for sale 1 Reply

Great opportunity for an SMJ enthusiast perhaps.  I'm not sure what you could actually do with this site though!…Continue

Started by Simon Stevens. Last reply by Simon Stevens May 17.

Ravenstone Wood as three way junction? 1 Reply

A close analysis of the 1945 RAF aerial photographs available in the historical imagery resource on Google Earth has provided evidence that Ravenstone Wood was probably a three-way junction during the latter part of WW2 and for an unknown period of…Continue

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Turntable at Burton Dassett 4 Replies

As part of my research prior to creating a model of the EHLR/SMJ junction at Burton Dassett, I’ve just had the privilege of looking through the original notes and letters produced by Eric Tonks whilst writing his 1948 book “The Edge Hill Light…Continue

Started by Mark Reader. Last reply by Mark Reader Mar 29.

The SMJR Great War Roll of Honour 11 Replies

Many of you will be aware that in common with all other railway companies the SMJR lost many of its employees for all or part of the Great War as the patriotic duty to volunteer was overwhelming.  Railwaymen were technically exempt but many chose to…Continue

Tags: of, Honour, Roll, War, SMJR

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Hi allI'm pleased to announce that the first volume of my history of…Continue

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Fenny Comptn

HelloI purchased the book « Track Layout Diagrams of the Great Western Railway and B.R. (W.R.) section 29 » « Stratford-upon-Avon & Midland Jcn Rly » by R.A.Cooke ISBN 10 :1 871674 20 4N page 29/9 on the 1903 track plan it shows a goods shed at…Continue

Started by Jack Freuville Oct 16, 2017.

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East & West Junction and SMJR liveries

East & West Junction Railway  (revised with extra information fromSimon Dunkley)

According to J M Dunn’s revised 1977 edition of The Stratford & Midland Junction Railway (Oakwood)

Locos numbered 1 - 12 prior to 1908 carried crimson lake livery, lined out with black edged on both sides by yellow, but locos 13 – 18 were painted dark blue.  Oval metal numberplates were carried on cab sides and similar ‘E&W’ ones on the tendersides of tender locos. Looking at old photos it can be seen that many if not all locos carried polish metal domes, at least for some of the time and some were photographed carrying polished metal bands around their chimneys and some had metal trimming edging splashers and a metal band where the smokebox joined the boiler. It’s not possible to tell from the photos what metal(s) were used ,but presumably the domes and chimney adornments were brass or copper.

But here is some possibly contradictory infomation obtained from "Britain's Railway liveries 1825 -1948" by Ernest F Carter - believed to be out of print (many thanks to Colin Franklin for discovering this info.) ‘Locomotives were black, and dome casings were also painted black.’ Either E F Carter got his facts wrong (not an unknown occurance!) or the E&W repainted its engines around 1908  and Dunn didn’t record this fact.

Thanks to Simon Dunkley for finding the following information.

''According to Riley and Simpson, the old Manning, Wardle was brown, lined yellow-black-yellow, as was number 2, at least until rebuilding in 1903/4. This may have been true of 3 and 4, but I am less sure of this (even as a guess!) 5 and 6 would have already been in red, for delivery to Swindon's other railway, and it is likely that the trio of DX goods locos arrived in unlined black and stayed that way until scrapping, save number 7 which appears to be lined in a photo dated 1915, although it is not totally clear. 10-12 were apparently delivered in crimson lake, and number 13 in blue! This was also applied to 14-16. Early photos of 3, 4, 5 and 6 show them without the E&W plates: my guess here - and it is just a guess - is that these were applied to 7,8,9 on arrival, to avoid confusion at Blisworth, and then applied to other locos as well. Number 10, of course, had a cab numberplate with E&W incorporated into it at one time.''

 

Stratford-upon-Avon and Midland Junction Railway

According to Dunn the SMJ painted all its locos black, lined out with green and yellow. They retained their E&W numberplates but had ‘SMJ’ painted in plain gold capitals on their tenders.  Som elocos carried their power class (lettered A to D, and in order of ascending power C,B,A,D) on their buffer beams. Coaches retained Midland crimson lake.

Again Carter differs and again quoting him:-

‘1910 - Engines were painted black and lined out in yellow. Coaches were chocolate-coloured, with cream upper panels.

1914 - Locomotives were black and coaches crimson-lake.

1915 - Locomotives were crimson-lake, lined out in yellow. Underframes were black. Coaches were crimson-lake with cream upper panels, and lined out in red and yellow.

1918 - Locomotives were lake and black, lined in yellow. Coaches were crimson-lake lined out in gold and lettered "SMJ".

1922- Engines: black and lake, lined out yellow, coaches: lake, lined out in gold.’

Conclusion

So did Dunn omit some information that Carter found out, or was some of Carter’s information suspect? Who knows? We know that Dunn had access SMJ records belonging to BR’s London Midland region and that he had access to Beyer Peacock’s loco data as well. I’m inclined to accept his version of livery events as more likely as he was limiting his research to the E&W’s and  SMJ’s liveries whereas Carter was trying to write a more general book about Britain’s railways’ liveries. Furthermore E F Carter was often rightly or wrongly criticised  for his alleged lack of factual accuracy in reviews of his books that appeared in Ian Allan magazines such as TI during the 50s and 60s, although I don't recall this actual book being slated.

Simon Dunkley is of a similar opinion. ''Whether 17 and 18 were delivered in blue or red or black, I do not know, but as far as I know - outside of Carter (frankly, I doubt the accuracy of his work with regard to such a minor line) - the SMJR livery was always black, lined green-yellow-green.

E&WJR & SMJR Carriage & Wagon Liveries

According to J M Dunn up to 1909 the E&W painted its coaches crimson lake below the waistband and cream above, then for a very short while they were painted crimson lake all over apart from a cream waistband, before changing later that year to all crimson lake similar to the Midland Railway when the SMJ came into being.

As for coaches, they are described as lake with cream upper panels and waist on the EWJR. Unfortunately, the lake bit is where the consensus stops, as various sources describe it as lake "like the LNWR", "like the GWR" and "like the Midland". Similary the cream can vary from a very pale colour to cream. In practice, if the "cream" was an off-white, the varnishes used at the time would have added a significantly yellow tinge to things, especially the white. At this remove we will never now. From the Railway Magazine article which sells the new SMJR very well (it couldn't have been written better by either of the Mr. Wilmotts - draw your own conclusions) the coach livery had become crimson lake with cream panels, and soon after this, with the arrival of coaches from the Midland, all over crimson lake seems to have been adopted. General practice at the time would suggest black ends as well as underframes, but you never know!

As for wagons, they seem to have been a mid-grey, but since this was based on white lead as a key ingredient, it would have darkened over time. White, unshaded, lettering seems to have been the norm.

To a large extent, the modeller of the EWJR can pick and choose with respect to loco liveries: a layout set in 1903 could have brown, red, black and blue locos running on it, all on a line with about a dozen locos!

Dunn makes no mention of wagon liveries but according to E F Carter –  ‘1908 - Some Midland brake vans were lettered "EWJR" for working over the East and West Junction Railway on the 3½ miles of this Company' s track on the route from Broom to London.

(With many thanks to Colin Franklin for providing the information obtained from E F Carter’s book.) and to Simon Dunkley for carefully checking Riley & Simpson and for providing most of the information about Carriage & Wagon Liveries.

 

Please feel free to add comments and possibly between us we will discover further info.

 

Dick Bodily May 2012

 

 

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Comment by NIGEL on January 8, 2013 at 21:24

This wagon was built by the

 BIRMINGHAM RAILWAY CARRIAGE & WAGON Co Ltd. BUILDERS SMETHWICK

The plate is oval with a "pie crust" edge.

Comment by Simon Dunkley on May 12, 2012 at 13:38

There is a lovely maker's photo of a timber bolster wagon, taken about 1903/4 time (and therefore out of copyright), which shows the EWJR carriage livery very well. It also shows a missing full-stop after the E!

Comment by Simon Dunkley on May 11, 2012 at 22:47

Just to muddy the waters, according to Riley and Simpson, the old Manning, Wardle was brown, lined yellow-black-yellow, as was number 2, at least until rebuilding in 1903/4. This may have been true of 3 and 4, but I am less sure of this (even as a guess!) 5 and 6 would have already been in red, for delivery to Swindon's other railway, and it is likely that the trio of DX goods locos arrived in unlined black and stayed that way until scrapping, save number 7 which appears to be lined in a photo dated 1915, although it is not totally clear. 10-12 were apparently delivered in crimson lake, and number 13 in blue! This was also applied to 14-16.

Whether 17 and 18 were delivered in blue or red or black, I do not know, but as far as I know - outside of Carter (frankly, I doubt the accuracy of his work with regard to such a minor line) - the SMJR livery was always black, lined green-yellow-green.

As for coaches, they are described as lake with cream upper panels and waist on the EWJR. Unfortunately, the lake bit is where the consensus stops, as various sources describe it as lake "like the LNWR", "like the GWR" and "like the Midland". Similary the cream can vary from a very pale colour to cream. In practice, if the "cream" was an off-white, the varnishes used at the time would have added a significantly yellow tinge to things, especially the white. At this remove we will never now. From the Railway Magazine article which sells the new SMJR very well (it couldn't have been written better by either of the Mr. Wilmotts - draw your own conclusions) the coach livery had become crimson lake with cream panels, and soon after this, with the arrival of coaches from the Midland, all over crimson lake seems to have been adopted. General practice at the time would suggest black ends as well as underframes, but you never know!

As for wagons, they seem to have been a mid-grey, but since this was based on white lead as a key ingredient, it would have darkened over time. White, unshaded, lettering seems to have been the norm.

Early photos of 3, 4, 5 and 6 show them without the E&W plates: my guess here - and it is just a guess - is that these were applied to 7,8,9 on arrival, to avoid confusion at Blisworth, and then applied to other locos as well. Number 10, of course, had a cab numberplate with E&W incorporated into it at one time.

To a large extent, the modeller of the EWJR can pick and choose with respect to loco liveries: a layout set in 1903 could have brown, red, black and blue locos running on it, all on a line with about a dozen locos!

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